Tag Archives: Arianne K.

Always Packing: Carrying Your Auto-Injector  

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It all started with a fanny-pack. It was a bright blue, yellow zippered, Tigger-themed fanny-pack to be exact. From the time I was five, to about twelve years old, this was the most important accessory I had. Why? It was the vehicle for carrying my auto-injector (my safety net and my security blanket).  Back in the 90’s, my bright blue fanny-pack was my ‘go-to’ item; but I quickly outgrew it and needed to find some other way to carry my auto-injector. Luckily, being a girl, I would eventually grow into carrying a purse with me everywhere. But, during my high school days, I hit those awkward preteen/ teen years. I was too young to carry a purse and too old for a fanny pack. I no longer had a permanent desk to put it in or one specific teacher to hold onto it for me. My locker was too far away and I wasn’t allowed to take a book bag with me everywhere. I needed to find another option to discretely and effectively transport my auto-injector while in school. Lucky for me, I had access to many carriers and tricks to help conceal my auto injector and keep it on me at all times.

I purchased a much smaller, stylish black case that I was able to put in my pencil case. But I also made sure I had one in my book bag in my locker at all times. Getting through those high school years was tough. Most people yearn to fit in. And I was much the same. So I refrained from telling many people about my auto-injector in my pencil case. The people I made aware were my teachers and a few close friends. Now I realize the importance of telling people about the location of my auto-injector and how to use it in case of an emergency.

As I grew up, I became more comfortable with my auto-injector and with my food allergies. I was able to find new ways to carry it around discretely. Being a girl, I was lucky to have the excuse of always having a purse with me. The problem I soon arrived at involved different sized purses and singular-sized auto-injectors. From small little clutches to extremely large purses, I was either fighting to find it or struggling to put it in. Luckily I’ve found a few tricks and discovered, through my male friends, that they also had some unique and creative ways to carry around their auto-injectors.  For me, I’ve always felt it is easier to carry my auto-injector in the side pocket of my purse. It’s easy to grab if there is an emergency and it’s easy to find if I can’t tell someone. There will be no more routing around in the deep caverns of my purse. With the new advancements in auto-injectors, it’s easier to carry them in pant pockets or in those pesky little clutches and purses I mentioned earlier. Some new auto-injectors are as small as a business card with a little width. They can be easily placed in most little bags. As for my male counterparts, carrying an auto-injector can be a little trickier as far as not drawing major attention. One the best ways I’ve seen them carried is in an ankle holster (a lá James Bond) that fits neatly under most pants. Those new auto-injectors I mentioned above are smaller and able to fit in most pockets discretely. There is also many companies offering carrying cases for various activities like belts for outdoor/upbeat activities from Waist Buddy (http://www.omaxcare.com/WaistBuddy.html) or the versatile brand Allergy Pack ( http://www.allergypack.com/) that offer many different styles to carry one or multiple auto-injectors. They even make carrying cases for asthma inhalers.

It doesn’t matter what you’re wearing, what kind of purse you’re sporting or what pants you may be in. It is always important to have your auto-injector with you when you go out.  It can be cumbersome and it can be awkward; but nothing is worse than needing it in an emergency and not having it. So remember to keep it with you. Tell someone you have it with you and where it is located. Think of it as the best and most practical fashion accessory you have; it also just so happens to go with any outfit.

Arianne K.

 

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No Eggs, No Problem: Egg Substitutes

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Nothing says welcome home like the fresh smell of baked goods wafting from your kitchen. Cookies, pies, cakes, you name it, sound delicious.  But there is one sneaky ingredient lurking in all of those delicious baked goods that could cause major problems: eggs. Eggs are currently on the list of the most common food allergies in Canada; but that doesn’t have to stop you from enjoying delicious treats of every kind. For many treats, there are many alternatives to crunchy, chewy centers; but what about the very makeup of the treat? Eggs provide rise, moisture, and fill to many different kinds of recipes.  The following three items are my most sacred baking tips for the most delectable, unique baked goods you’ll find. These are recipes that your friends will beg you to tell them or demand you make when you bake.

1)  Yogurt

We all love chocolate chip cookies. They can be gooey and chewy or crunchy and satisfying. But what about those pesky eggs in the recipe?  Well, the purpose of the eggs in this particular recipe is to add moisture to the batter. To add a little kick to your already perfected chocolate chip cookies, try putting a table spoon of plain 1 percent yogurt for each egg called for in the recipe. The yogurt will supply the batter with enough moisture and add a delicious taste that will leave people wondering what that special ingredient is.

2)  Coconut Milk/Butter

It’s delicious, it’s sweet, it’s the perfect low-fat substitute for many baked goods. It provides excellent moisture to batters as well providing items like breads, cookies, and muffins, an extra sweet taste; so you can cut back on the sugar you add to your recipe. Coconut butter can be used in breads and muffins to add sweetness to things that also don’t require a lot of sugar. For each egg called for, use a tablespoon of butter or 1/3 cup of the milk. If you’re using the milk, make sure to add baking soda so your mixture isn’t too wet. If you feel like your batter is too wet, add some flour.

3) Baking Soda

Odorless, virtually-tasteless baking soda is a Godsend to those of us who bake without eggs. Why are they so great? It provides rise or lift to certain baked goods that need to stand to attention, like breads, cookies, muffins, cupcakes, and cakes. It has no taste (always make sure to check it so it hasn’t gone bad. If it has, it will have a very sour taste.) and it gives substantial lift without making your goods too dense or heavy. For each egg, add half a tablespoon of baking soda and a tablespoon of hot water together, mix separately, then add it to mixture.

Baking is fun, therapeutic, experimental, and has endless possibilities. Just because there are certain things we can’t put in our baked goods doesn’t mean we have to place limitations upon the things we bake. So get in the kitchen and see what you can create! Above is my favorite recipe for delicious chocolate-chip cookies. Enjoy, and happy baking!

Arianne K. 

Living with Allergies in Canada: Canadian Laws

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Currently, Canada has several laws in place to help people with allergies stay safe in various forms. The following two laws are the most important currently in place in Canada to keep those with anaphylaxis safe in both school and consumer environments.

Food Allergen Labeling:

Canada’s food allergy labelling has continued to be evaluated and adapted over the years. Gathering input from key stakeholders, Health Canada most recently made food production safer by publishing two separate Amendments to the Allergen Labeling Regulations, 2008 and 2011, to the Canadian Gazette. Both encouraged public comments from Canadian citizens that were then taken into consideration and formulated into the later amendment. These laws are put in place to help consumers decide on the best possible products for their allergen needs.

The Canadian food allergen labeling regulation came into force on August 4, 2012. This law requires prepackaged foods to list all priority allergens, including ones that are included in “component” ingredients such as “spices” or “seasonings”. Health Canada has a specific page on their website dedicated to informing the Canadian public about possible cross-contamination in foods that may not be labeled. Since the new law has been put into action, they are proactive on social media in terms of attempting to inform key stakeholders such as companies, consumers, and advertisers, about any issues related to labeling in Canada.

Sabrina’s Law:

2) Sabrina’s Law was created in 2005 and implemented in 2006 to protect students in public schools from allergen risks. The law requires Ontario schools to put anaphylaxis policies in place at every school to protect students. This is a break through law with the aim to ensure that students at-risk for anaphylaxis will feel as safe as possible while attending school. The sad fact is that this law came to be as a result of the tragic passing of Sabrina Shannon in 2003. If you would like to learn more about these laws, or see how the Canadian Government is adapting to better inform and protect people with severe food allergies please visit the following websites:

Sabrina Shannon Law: http://www.anaphylaxis.ca/en/resources/sabrinas_law.html

Health Canada:
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/label-etiquet/allergen/index-eng.php

Arianne

 

 

 

Alcohol and Allergies

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At some point or another, we’ve all found ourselves in an establishment where the drafts are cold and glasses are never empty. You could be staring down a glass of beer or casually enjoying a glass of wine. That being said, there are important things you should know when it comes to drinking alcohol when you have food allergies.

Some of the key tips discussed are ‘common sense’ whether you have a food allergy or not. Always know your limit and never play with the line between social drinking over consumption. When you are in control, your night can remain fun rather than hazy. Knowing when to say ‘enough is enough’ is the key to enjoying your night out not having any regrets. Never accept drinks from strangers and always make sure you watch your bartender make your drinks in a crowded bar.

Always be aware of your surroundings, know where you are, who you are drinking with, and always have an escape plan home. A safe, planned ride home goes a long way toward having an easy night with few worries.

Now, when you’re discussing food allergies and alcohol, you have to understand that there are two things to think about. Your allergens can be hiding in different liquors, cocktails, or you could have a very real alcohol allergy or intolerance. Regardless of what your ‘poison’ is, being aware of what you’re consuming is the first step toward understanding and taking control of your food allergies

Alcohol Allergy:

An alcohol allergy or intolerance is caused by the body’s inability to break down alcohol. Given that alcohol allergies are rare, the more likely culprits are the grains sulphites, and preservatives found in many wines, beers, and liquors. A simple way to determine if you have an alcohol allergy is to get tested. A skin-based prick test (much like the one for other allergens) is administered and the skins reaction is the key to determining the severity or existence of the allergy.

If you’re worried you may have an alcohol allergy the common symptoms include but are not limited to:

  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Abdomen pain
  • Nasal Congestion
  • Itchy or inflamed skin
  • Hives
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Runny nose

Take into consideration what type of alcohol you’re consuming and how much if you are experiencing any of these symptoms. Take this information to your allergist and discuss your options

Drinking with a preexisting Food Allergy:

If you have food allergies, you are likely already pretty good at expressing the seriousness of them. The precautions you should take are similar whether you’re out eating or partaking in a night of drinking. Take some time to research different alcohols and what their ingredients are; you will be surprised how many allergens are hiding in plain sight.

There are more options available now more than ever if you’re looking for alcohol that is gluten free. Some vodkas that are triple distilled are safe for gluten intolerance and numerous beer companies are releasing gluten-free beer. Check with the manufacturer directly to be sure.

After you’ve researched what alcohols are safe for your specific food allergies, you’re ready to sit down and enjoy a drink.  If you’re drinking at an establishment, consider a few things. Make sure you know the ingredients of your choice of mixed drink; you never know what could be hiding in that delicious looking beverage. If you happen to be somewhere that also has food, as always, make sure you inform your server and the bartender mixing your drink of your allergy. Stick to what you know and like. Experimenting and finding a new favorite drink is fine; but always make sure it is safe. Try and stay with one drink for the night. Mixing drinks is a recipe for a rough morning and, besides, it’s safer knowing exactly what you’re drinking. Of course, remember to bring your auto-injector with you on your night out.

A night shared with friends and/or family can be a memory you’ll treasure forever.  People come together for drinks and food. In order to embrace that feeling, and take in those memories, take precautions with your food allergies. Remembering a few simple guidelines, and taking time to research not only your allergens but your preferences, can help you enjoy your night out. So raise a glass to health and happiness and have a good night.

Cheers,

 

Arianne