Tag Archives: Responsible Drinking

Halloween as an Adult with Food Allergies

Jack O' Lantern on leaves in the woods

Halloween has always been one of my favorite holidays. I love to dress up, eat candy, and go out. I feel like it’s the one time of the year where you can let you inner child out and just simply “be” whatever you want. I feel like with allergies, though, Halloween can bring a whole storm of worries and concerns. When I was growing up and I went trick-or-treating, it would take forever to look through every single piece of candy in my bag and audit whether or not the candy was safe for me to eat. At the end of the night, I would have two piles; one pile of candy I could eat, and one pile of candy I couldn’t eat and would give to my neighbour. As an adult though, Halloween is so different. It’s one of the biggest nights of the year to go out. Don’t think that just because you’re not trick-or-treating anymore that you can let your guard down. Follow these tips to ensure a healthy happy Halloween this year:

  • Always carry your EpiPen® on you – just in case anything happens, you want to be prepared.
  • Only consume beverages and food where you know the ingredients – If you don’t know what’s in the green juice your friends are passing around, don’t drink it. Last Halloween, I went to a bar and ordered a vodka tonic. When I received the drink, it was blue. I told the bartender that he had given me the wrong order, but then he informed me that he had “spiced” up my drink by adding a blue liquor and gin to the vodka to make it more special. I’m allergic to gin. If I had decided to not ask questions and to just drink the beverage that was given to me, I would’ve put myself in a very scary situation.
  • Don’t drink too much! I always make sure that I never drink myself to the point of intoxication. When I see my friends after nights that we’ve gone out and tell me that they literally don’t remember the night, it scares me. What if that happened to me and I just happened to ingest an allergen not thinking about the consequences? It’s just not a situation you want to put yourself in.

Halloween is my favorite time of the year, and you can stay safe and still have fun with allergies. Now, I’m off to go figure out my Halloween costume this year and make my plans!

Happy Halloween,

– Giulia C.

Allergies at the Club/Bar: Top 3 Tips

#1-Never Drink on An Empty Stomach
Ensure you eat an allergen friendly meal before heading out the club or bar. You never know if there will be an allergy-safe option to munch on in the bar and if you do plan on drinking, you might not be in the best state of mind to inform wait staff of your food allergy. Also, if you plan on staying at the club until closing time… your options for some grub will be significantly reduced and you may not be able to find a safe option.

#2- Stick to Allergy Safe Drinks
Broken-down-golf cart, Baby Guinness, White Freezie, Bazooka Joe, Cherry Cheesecake; they all sound fun don’t they!? Despite tempting names and specials on shots or specialty drinks, it is always best to stick to drinks that you know. If you feel you are still of sound mind, you can always ask the bartender about the ingredients. Keep in mind to ask about garnishes, and the tumblers used to mix drinks—you don’t want to risk cross-contamination.

Group of happy friends dancing at night party

#3- Check Ingredients; Do Some Research
Allergens can be present in alcohol and it’s important to be educated on current Canadian labelling laws. According to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency regarding alcoholic beverages:  “…if added allergens, gluten sources and sulphites at level of 10 ppm or more are present, they must to be declared. The new labelling requirements do not apply to standardized beer, ale, stout, porter or malt liquor products. These products will be dealt with once further consultations and discussions can be held by Health Canada.”  Learn more about alcohol labelling.

Therefore, in order for you to check out ingredients of some liquor (like beer for example), you may need to contact companies directly. Don’t assume that because one company makes allergen safe liquor, that all types of that liquor are safe. You should check with each brand as different methods may be used to blend and distill their alcoholic product.

– Nicole K.

St. Patrick’s Day with a Food Allergy

St. Patrick’s Day is always a fun holiday where people scramble to a1find anything they own that is green, eat pancakes all day, and may indulge in a few too many beers. In order to ensure that you have both a safe and fun day of the Irish here are my top 5 tips to celebrating if you are at-risk for anaphylaxis.

  1. Always carry your auto-injector!

This is a good tip for everyday life but it is especially important to ensure you have your auto-injector on you at all times on a day where you may be in unfamiliar bars or surrounded by new people. For the ladies, it is probably safer to keep your auto-injector on your body as opposed to a bag or purse which could easily get lost or even taken.

  1. Know what you are drinking

People tend to be very generous on St. Patty’s Day and may offer to share their drink or buy a round for everyone. It is important to know all of the ingredients and types of alcohol in the drinks you are consuming. There are many websites from bloggers and articles who have compiled lists of liquors and common allergens they contain. You can check out this blog http://www.nutmums.com/nut-free-alcohol/ and a previous AWA post on Alcohol and Allergies https://adultswithallergies.com/2014/04/16/alcohol-and-allergies/.

  1. Stick with your friends

It is easy to meet new people and stray from the group of friends you started out with on St. Patty’s Day but it is important to ensure that you always have someone nearby who is aware of your allergies. Having a person who has got your back throughout the day can be very helpful in case you drink a little too much or if you ever needed help with a reaction. Someone who knows where your auto-injector is, how to use it, and the steps to take in case of an emergency is key!

  1. Know your limit

As you may or may not know, consuming alcohol limits your inhibitions and increases risk-taking behavior. When it comes to those at-risk for anaphylaxis, risk taking is something that is best to avoid at all costs! Know what your limit is when it comes to alcohol consumption and try to alternate with non-alcoholic drinks throughout the day so that you can still be aware, make good choices, and stay hydrated.

  1. Have fun!

Although it is important to be careful when celebrating on St. Patrick’s Day you should never let your food allergies limit the amount of the fun you have or the experiences you take part in.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Lindsay S.

Eating at Family Members’ Homes During the Holidays and Year-Round

HiRes

Eating at friend or family member’s home over the holidays can be awkward. As much as we love the quality time, sometimes people ‘forget’ about your allergens or just don’t fully understand the severity of them. Here are my top ten tips for dining at family member’s homes during the holidays.

  • Avoid potlucks if possible. I get it. Hosting an event is a lot of work. However, people’s lack of knowledge surrounding ingredients, not to mention cross-contamination, can make this dining situation a risky event.
  • Plan visits between meal times. Obviously, people love to pig out during the holidays. It just seems that eating and catching up with cousins and family are a part of the holiday season. However, try and plan events during mealtimes to relieve any unnecessary stress or concern. Why not go tobogganing or skating instead?
  • Do communal food preparation. Help out with the host in the food preparation process. Being behind the scenes can enlighten you on ingredients and how things were made. You will have a much better understanding of what options are viable.
  • Suggest recipes or menu themes that you know are safe. Depending on what your allergens are, you can always suggest menu items that you know are safe. You can make it fun by challenging people to the best pasta cook off or seven layer dip fiesta (of course this is assuming that you can eat these items). Using this method, you don’t have to worry as much about people bringing dishes you cannot eat.
  • Have your auto-injector on hand. Make sure you bring it. Whether you decide to store it in your purse, jacket pocket or snowsuit, you should have it on you at all times.
  • Always bring a dish you know is safe. It is definitely better to have one safe option to eat versus no safe option at all! Express this to your host and have them scoop some of your delicious contribution separately before sharing it with guests. This way, you can avoid cross-contamination of your amazing, and allergen-friendly, side dish.
  • Check labels upon arrival. Don’t hesitate to ask the host to keep labels from food items. Upon arriving at their humble abode, take a gander at the lists to ensure that the meal will be safe for your consumption. Don’t forget about sauces such as meat marinades and salad dressings. It may feel weird to dig through a garbage can for a label. But I guarantee that it is better than digging into your pocket for your auto-injector.
  • Always pack a snack for yourself. Even if you’re assured that you will be accommodated, it is best to come prepared with a snack or alternative food to eat. It will definitely beat going hungry.
  • If you experience any allergic symptoms, let someone know. Just in case something does happen, make sure you let someone know immediately (preferably a trusted family member who can help keep you calm, assist with the auto-injector, and get you the help you need). Accidents do happen and the most important thing to remember is that you need to communicate! Isolating yourself in an emergency by ‘going to the bathroom’ can be dangerous!
  • Be grateful. As always, you should politely thank your hosts for having you over—especially if they are accommodating! Make sure you voice your appreciation for any extra steps they took in making sure you had a comfortable evening and they’ll be sure to invite you over next year.

Nicole K.

Food Allergies and the Transition to University Life

University Students laptop
If you have a food allergy, the transition to university can be a pretty daunting experience. In high school, you were likely surrounded by people who had known you well for many years and teachers who knew your name. In university, the chances of this happening again are quite slim. Most classes contain 400+ students and, unless you manage to schedule time to meet with your professors multiple times, they likely won’t know your name let alone your food allergy. So what’s the good news? The good news is that you prepared for this ahead of time and are ready for the new challenge of independence! In case you’re still in the preparation phase, I’ve put together a few things to think about and look for within your new environment.

Let’s start with the dorm life. Many first year dorms or residences contain a lot of shared bedrooms where the room is shared with a roommate. Every school is different so be sure to scope out possible residence options when you apply to that school. Also, be sure to educate your roommate (if you have one) and all new friends about your food allergies and the proper administration of your auto-injector. You are definitely going to eat in your room, which means your roommate will also eat there. With this in mind, your safety is paramount. If your roommate doesn’t understand the severity of your food allergy, speak with the residence life staff and ask them to help you explain it. Also, don’t be afraid to make special room requests when applying or even after being accepted to a university. You can ask to be placed in an allergy-friendly room or ask for a solo room to ensure your safety.

Next up, cafeteria food. If you are living in a residence with no shared kitchen, you will likely be eating a lot of campus food. Treat this experience as you would going to a local restaurant. Explain the severity of your food allergy to the food staff and ask if they serve any food that may contain your allergen(s). Then ask to speak with a manager or supervisor to ensure you will be looked after for that day and every day in the next year. Ask if the staff know what cross-contamination means and whether or not there is any risk of this with their food. Lastly, stick with your gut feeling. If you feel uneasy about eating at a particular cafeteria or restaurant, move on! There are plenty of other options on campus to fill your stomach.

Another thing to look into for your university is anaphylaxis policies. These can be quite difficult to navigate and find. Even if your school does have policies for food allergies, they are likely to appear on a continuum from either very diverse to cover every food allergy to very specific where less-severe allergies may be overlooked. These are worth taking the time to look into as it may inform a lot of your food choices on campus. If you find that food allergy policies do not exist at your university, you might want to join a university council or speak with a campus political leader to try to put a new policy in place. These people are working to make the student experience more positive; so don’t be afraid to ask! They will almost always do everything they can to help.

Last but not least, parties. By now, you’ve likely been exposed to parties and have learned a few things about managing your food allergy in a party atmosphere. However, at university and college, alcoholic drinks tend to make an appearance. This may be a new obstacle for you and, if it is, remember to keep a level head. If you notice that a drinking game has people sharing cups, it is a good idea to avoid playing that game since you don’t know what these people ate earlier in the day. It could have been your food allergen! Also, stick to drinks you know to be safe for you. There are many different types of alcoholic beverages out there and some contain almond extract, hazelnut, dairy, etcetera. So stay aware and stay safe.

This may seem like a lot to look out for when also trying to manage the new challenges of course work; but remember that you are independent and are ready to conquer university!

Dylan B.

Alcohol and Allergies

800px-Brugal_11

At some point or another, we’ve all found ourselves in an establishment where the drafts are cold and glasses are never empty. You could be staring down a glass of beer or casually enjoying a glass of wine. That being said, there are important things you should know when it comes to drinking alcohol when you have food allergies.

Some of the key tips discussed are ‘common sense’ whether you have a food allergy or not. Always know your limit and never play with the line between social drinking over consumption. When you are in control, your night can remain fun rather than hazy. Knowing when to say ‘enough is enough’ is the key to enjoying your night out not having any regrets. Never accept drinks from strangers and always make sure you watch your bartender make your drinks in a crowded bar.

Always be aware of your surroundings, know where you are, who you are drinking with, and always have an escape plan home. A safe, planned ride home goes a long way toward having an easy night with few worries.

Now, when you’re discussing food allergies and alcohol, you have to understand that there are two things to think about. Your allergens can be hiding in different liquors, cocktails, or you could have a very real alcohol allergy or intolerance. Regardless of what your ‘poison’ is, being aware of what you’re consuming is the first step toward understanding and taking control of your food allergies

Alcohol Allergy:

An alcohol allergy or intolerance is caused by the body’s inability to break down alcohol. Given that alcohol allergies are rare, the more likely culprits are the grains sulphites, and preservatives found in many wines, beers, and liquors. A simple way to determine if you have an alcohol allergy is to get tested. A skin-based prick test (much like the one for other allergens) is administered and the skins reaction is the key to determining the severity or existence of the allergy.

If you’re worried you may have an alcohol allergy the common symptoms include but are not limited to:

  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Abdomen pain
  • Nasal Congestion
  • Itchy or inflamed skin
  • Hives
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Runny nose

Take into consideration what type of alcohol you’re consuming and how much if you are experiencing any of these symptoms. Take this information to your allergist and discuss your options

Drinking with a preexisting Food Allergy:

If you have food allergies, you are likely already pretty good at expressing the seriousness of them. The precautions you should take are similar whether you’re out eating or partaking in a night of drinking. Take some time to research different alcohols and what their ingredients are; you will be surprised how many allergens are hiding in plain sight.

There are more options available now more than ever if you’re looking for alcohol that is gluten free. Some vodkas that are triple distilled are safe for gluten intolerance and numerous beer companies are releasing gluten-free beer. Check with the manufacturer directly to be sure.

After you’ve researched what alcohols are safe for your specific food allergies, you’re ready to sit down and enjoy a drink.  If you’re drinking at an establishment, consider a few things. Make sure you know the ingredients of your choice of mixed drink; you never know what could be hiding in that delicious looking beverage. If you happen to be somewhere that also has food, as always, make sure you inform your server and the bartender mixing your drink of your allergy. Stick to what you know and like. Experimenting and finding a new favorite drink is fine; but always make sure it is safe. Try and stay with one drink for the night. Mixing drinks is a recipe for a rough morning and, besides, it’s safer knowing exactly what you’re drinking. Of course, remember to bring your auto-injector with you on your night out.

A night shared with friends and/or family can be a memory you’ll treasure forever.  People come together for drinks and food. In order to embrace that feeling, and take in those memories, take precautions with your food allergies. Remembering a few simple guidelines, and taking time to research not only your allergens but your preferences, can help you enjoy your night out. So raise a glass to health and happiness and have a good night.

Cheers,

 

Arianne