Tag Archives: Sports

Cycling Preparations with Food Allergies

Why I’m biking from Toronto to Ottawa:

Last fall, I realized I had spent yet another summer with a pretty new bike and not a lot of biking. I decided that I needed motivation to get on my bike, and the joy of commuting in the rain just wasn’t enough.

I wanted to finally plan a big bike trip. I spoke with my allergist about it who recommended that I plan a route that considers a 30-minute ambulance response time. I’m allergic to a variety of fruits and vegetables, tree nuts, black pepper, and sulphites, so that’s a pretty reasonable request. After meeting with my allergist, I then talked to a paramedic friend of mine, to see where I could bike while staying in range of hospitals and ambulances. “Why not just come on the Paramedic Ride?” he joked. But then we both realized that it was actually a pretty good idea! I’m happy to raise awareness and funds for a Paramedic Memorial, and I get a very safe bike trip in the deal! Plus, I figured that meeting more paramedic friends is not a bad idea!

How I got ready:

This trip was mostly complicated by how to transport my bicycle, and how to manage my food allergies. I started getting ready last fall, by borrowing a winter trainer. I didn’t get it set up until Christmas, but then I got into a rhythm of biking in the garage while watching Netflix. The sawdust in my garage was mildly itchy at times and going outside in the winter after training hard involved quite a brief cold spurt (if I had more space I’d definitely consider bringing the trainer indoors).

I quickly discovered that learning to bike long distances with allergies also involves learning to make sport snacks and foods. I read A LOT in an attempt to figure out how to make an electrolyte drink, and when I realized I was tired from lacking them, I started adding a little more salt and a lot more protein to my biking snacks. I would highly recommend The Feed Zone Portables cookbook for a variety of “from-scratch” sport food ideas.

In the end, I settled for mostly eating bananas, making cookies, and occasionally making granola bars. I gave up on the granola bars half way through the summer when my jaw started hurting because they were too chewy (oops) but I will definitely keep trying recipes. On the electrolyte front, there are a bunch of great DIY recipes, but most involve a few ingredients I am not yet allowed to consume. So I talked to my mom, a nurse in the remote town of Angola, and she explained that for a better-than-nothing solution she usually puts a spoon of sugar, two pinches of salt, and a bit of flavouring into a litre of water. I’ve translated that into 1 scant teaspoon of salt, 1 heaping teaspoon of sugar, and a good splash of homemade ginger syrup into 1.5 litres of water. It’s not perfect or ideal, but I reserve its use for days when it’s really hot or when I’m doing a long bike workout (30-km or more).

With all the food and snacks prepared, I have managed 2500-km of biking so far in 2018, with my longest ride being a 115-km trip around the small town of Carp, Ontario. I might have had a little too much fun in my last week of training, biking around the city on specific streets to “write” out the fundraising website!

 

What I brought with me:

Most importantly, I packed a couple epinephrine auto-injectors. I’d usually bring more for a big trip, but the Canada-wide Epi-Pen® shortage makes my pharmacy reluctant to pass out more than absolutely needed. That being said, I’m not concerned since we’re getting an ambulance escort for the event.

Because I didn’t want to give the ride organizers the extra hassle of arranging safe food for me, I decided I’d pack my own food. Bananas and oranges are pretty much guaranteed to be supplied at biking events, and if not, I can definitely stock up on them in any little grocery store I encounter along the way. I have a few simple snack foods like Nori (seaweed), rice crackers, chocolate chips, and homemade cookies.

That left me with the meal food left to plan, as well as figuring out how to cook it. I didn’t want to just eat sandwiches, and since this ride has the luxury of ambulance support vehicles, I planned a few frozen meals and a number of homemade dehydrated ones as well. To cook these, I brought a one-burner electric stove, a frying pan for at the hotel, and a Hot Logic Mini (basically a plug-in lunchbox which heats meals and keeps them warm; it’s going to be my secret to instant hot meals whenever I stop). The frying pan is for boiling water for breakfast and will act as a general backup for cooking. I know hotels have microwaves sometimes, but they can be a pain to clean up, and they heat things less evenly. Plus, I hear we’re often stopping for lunch in parks for this event.

Lastly, I also made sure to think through my drink situation. At home I drink tap water, because some water filters contain trace amounts of sulphites (including some bottled waters), which give me predictable hives. I know the ride provides bottled water, so I’m just going to fill up each day with the water that I feel most safe drinking.

So now I have allergen-safe food and water, my bicycle, the hotel is booked, and I’ve been biking A LOT all summer. I feel ready, I’ve landed in Toronto… here I go!

– Janice H.

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Skiing with Allergies

Downhill skiing attracts those from all ages to ski hills and resorts during the winter months to enjoy the thrill of “carving pow” and enjoying time with friends and family, sipping hot chocolate in the chalet après ski. Downhill skiing also boasts health benefits, with moderate skiing burning approximately 400 calories per hour, increasing aerobic capacity, and improving leg strength and core stability. However, it is important to recognize some risks of skiing with allergies.

Remote locations

Ski hills are often located in exciting and remote locations, often a few hours from hospital facilities. Many ski hills and resorts can be situated near local hospitals, or even major health centres, but on a mountain, it may take time to get down to transportation. There are locations on the mountain that lend themselves to further isolation, such as chairlifts and gondolas. Often times you can find a skier having a bite of a snack on the chairlift or in the gondola while enjoying the wondrous mountain views. An allergic reaction in this situation, albeit rare, may be tricky. Furthermore, the best ski conditions are during or after heavy snow falls, so prime skiing may involve a treacherous drive to the closest emergency facility. In 2012, a news reporter Gemma Morris suffered an anaphylactic reaction at the chalet of a European ski resort and was transported to hospital where she spent 24 hours in the intensive care unit (Daily Mail). Thankfully the weather was clear, but a snowstorm in this situation may have impeded Morris’ travel to hospital and possibly worsened her care. Knowing how long it might take get to a local hospital will definitely keep your mind at ease while enjoying some exciting skiing or snowboarding after a fresh, crisp snowfall.

Health Facilities

It can be good to know that some ski hills do house physicians on site. Larger resorts often have medical centres where physicians or nurses are able to diagnose and treat skier and snowboarder ailments, such as broken limbs, and even help treat allergic reactions. However, some patients may need definitive care at a local hospital. Knowing the resort’s medical facilities in advance can also help ease the stress of being in a relatively remote location.

Extended stays

Ski and snowboard trips often extend for a few days, so it’s important to understand the implications of an allergic reaction on the ski hill. Let me put forth an example where a young male skier suffers an anaphylactic reaction on day one of a three-day vacation. He is taken to the medical facility on the mountain where he is treated, observed, and then safely discharged. There may be considerable anxiety about having another reaction, especially if the first one occurred accidentally at one of the chalets or restaurants. It might be a good plan to bring some safe food that you know is allergy friendly in the event that options may be limited at the mountain. This is also why it is important to take a few minutes and either call or research the food options at the mountain before departing.

My story

I am an adult with several life-threatening food allergies and I enjoy skiing. I live about 2 hours from a large, Canadian ski resort, but the first time I was planning to venture up the mountain I was scared of an allergic reaction on the ski hill. The hill is remote. What if a reaction happened while skiing after a snack and I crashed? What if it happened while snacking in the gondola up the mountain? I listened to some advice from a friend, brought extra food which I knew was safe, made sure to pack two auto-injectors in my jacket and not forget them in the car or in my backpack, and researched how far away the nearest hospital was (including a print-out of directions to the hospital). The first time I visited the hill and skied, I was anxious, but after some brief but important preparation, I had a blast! I skied there 16 times that winter, and this winter I’ve been back for more wide turns, fresh powder, and allergy safe hot chocolate! Shred the pow!

– Fraser K.

Food Allergies at Hockey Games

Being Canadian and growing up in a family that both plays and loves hockey, I have been to my fair share of hockey games throughout my life. Whether it is at a local rink watching my brothers play or watching the Toronto Maple Leafs at the Air Canada Centre, I have always enjoyed the classic Canadian sport. At most hockey arenas, food is typically served, which brings an inherent risk for those with allergies, but if you make sure you play it safe you can enjoy a hockey night in Canada live in action.

I can only speak to my NHL game experience here in Toronto so make sure you check out your local arena before attending a game!

  1. There are a lot of options for food

Most arenas will have a wide variety of fast food options for you to choose from. They can range from your classic hot dogs and pizza to poutine and gourmet burgers. There are typically stands that are owned by the arena itself and often common fast food chains will have booths there as well. Therefore, you should have lots to choose from and might have some familiar brands that you know are safe to eat from.

  1. Plan ahead

If you know you won’t have a meal at home prior to attending the game, take a quick look at the website of the arena you are going to. Most of them will have information on their food services and will list what food vendors are there. This can help you plan an allergy-friendly meal in advance.

A bowl of popcorn with a glass of soda at a sports game.

  1. See if you can bring your own food

A simple internet search should give you some helpful information about food allergies at the arena. For example, the Air Canada Centre has a page on their website stating that fans with food allergies are permitted to bring their own food in and warn that they do sell peanuts in the arena.

  1. Be on the look out

Peanuts are not only a very common allergen, they are also commonly found at sporting events. Since most venues will likely not be peanut-free, if you are allergic to peanuts make sure to take a quick scan of the area around you to see if anybody is eating them. You are attending any game at your own risk, but if you are with a group of friends you can ask to switch seats to keep you away from any nuts.

  1. Have fun!

Going to watch the good ol’ hockey game is all about having fun and supporting your home team. Don’t let your food allergies limit you from attending a game!

– Lindsay S.